Fake Blood

“‘A brave man’s blood is the best thing on this earth when a woman is in trouble.’” - Van Helsing to Quincey Morris, Dracula, Bram Stoker.

But what if you are only faking brave and therefore faking blood? Well, I have a favourite recipe:

Take one human.

Puncture.

Repeat as desired.

AC is looking at me as if this won’t be helpful. All right. Here’s what we mixed up when she went to a party as Jack the Ripper.

Take about two tablespoons of golden syrup.

Add about a teaspoon of red food colouring and a single drop of blue food colouring.

AC insisted on tasting it at this point. Apparently it tastes good. I was not inclined to follow in her footsteps.

Next we added some coffee grounds. About a teaspoon. By some alchemy this makes the fake blood smell a tiny bit like real blood, and gives a slightly coagulated effect.


This is what it looks like applied on paper. This is a prop AC used in her costume, and thus is about six months old, totally dried and non sticky.

This formula is perfect for creating wounds and even has the consistency of real blood. Note how it drips down.

Apparently it still tastes pretty good, but smells awful. Smeared blood doesn’t look too dissimilar from this.

The girl had to get an obligatory “vampire” shot in. I almost enabled you to escape from it. But obviously I failed.

NOTES:

Fake blood will appear lighter on film than in real life. If in doubt, make it darker.

This recipe is remarkably washable, though I wouldn’t recommend putting it all down the front of your favorite Westwood. Again, Jim.

Edible and non toxic. If you want to thicken it use corn flour. (Corn starch for you Americans.)

I have been informed Golden Syrup is pretty much brown corn syrup. If you can only find the latter, use as normal and add a bit of cocoa powder.

Blood in water dilutes to yellow, not pink. We’re working on that one, though I say my first method is most effective.

SM